HVAC Exposed! 20 Suggestions for Daring Ductwork

After something shunned and banished to crawl spaces and attics, exposed ductwork is on the increase for a design element — and as an energy-efficient alternative. Naturally, those contemplating vaulted ceilings or raising headroom within their home will need to consider what’s hidden above. Fantastic thing savvy designers understand how to generate a simple, utilitarian feature pack a major design punch. Playing size, shape, angles and color enables exposed systems to operate in almost any space.

Designer Cavin Costello of The Ranch Mine in Phoenix uses the approach when remodeling older houses without attic space. In sweltering cities in which temperatures frequently blow beyond 110 degrees, installing ductwork on roofs and piping cool air through the oven-like atmosphere doesn’t make sense in terms of energy efficiency. “You put the ducts in the envelope of the house, also it helps it keep cool,” Costello says. “It is more efficient. You don’t even have to add insulation at the top of them. It cuts down on cost like that, too.”

Here’s to maximum exposure.

The Ranch Mine

Regardless of the challenge of 8-foot-high ceilings, Costello needed to proceed with exposed ducts within this Phoenix-area home, because the midcentury house didn’t have attic space. The only other feasible option was to operate the machine on the roof — not effective in a scorching-hot city, nor aesthetically pleasing.

The Ranch Mine

To lower prices in another project, Costello went with an off-the-shelf-type duct. To make it unique, however — rather than remove from the wooden support beam — he split the system into two smaller vents rather than having one big one.

Peter A. Sellar – Architectural Photographer

Smart ductwork can solve cognitive difficulties, too. A towering ceiling becomes mediated by exposed beams and symmetrical ductwork here.

Elad Gonen

Sleek and minimalist, this magnificent duct is a powerful decor statement all its own.

Domiteaux + Baggett Architects, PLLC

Likewise, this simple design is an eye-pleasing element in a contemporary dining area.

moss

Even the simplest models can work miracles. Here, room-spanning ductwork enlightens a modern design wrapped in rustic timber.

Ryan Duebber Architect, LLC

The exposure system works in areas with low ceilings. In this basement lounge area, a jet-black duct system adds depth to an otherwise closed-in area.

Thom Filicia Inc..

Painting the vulnerable system here pares it down, making way for textural impact in line with the diverse decor.

Momoko Morton

On the flip side, the big, rectangular duct here takes the bold and edgy decor one step farther.

Rad Design Inc

Getting creative with angles allows this system at a Toronto loft dazzle. The tube cascades from a bedroom to the living and kitchen spaces, paralleling the stairs path.

Nicholas Moriarty Interiors

Slick exposed metal causes a fashionable stir within this masculine scheme.

In wood-happy spaces, big shimmering metal accents help divide the material palette.

Elad Gonen

But don’t feel confined to metal. Consider painting ductwork to complement different components.

Angela Todd Designs, Portland, OR

The ceiling is a superb place for incorporating comparison, too. Although this kitchen says urban nation, the ceiling screams modern industrial.

Gus Duffy AIA

A duct run across a wall rather than down the centre adds play while allowing the exposed rafters steal the show .

Charleston Home + Design Mag

Exposed ducts allow ceilings being erase impeded by homeowners. Here it started up a head-turning stability of lines.

Jane Kim Design

Tucked away in gorgeous wood rafters, this system offers a welcome piece of surprise.

Exposed ducts don’t have to be confined to only open living spaces. This small and subtle one is a slam dunk in this bedroom.

Spacecrafting / Architectural Photography

Subtle changes in size and form may draw the eyes together numerous blank lines.

Sandvold Blanda Architecture + Interiors LLC

A crisp corner-hugging layout instills the sophisticated vibe of this TV room.

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Must-Know Modern Home: Villa Savoye

In the 1920s Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, 1887–1965) developed his influential Five Points Toward a New Architecture through Posts in the journal L’Esprit Nouveau and a series of residential commissions. These culminated in 1931 with the conclusion of the Villa Savoye outside Paris, which is thought to be one of the most important buildings — residential or otherwise — of the modern movement.

The home encapsulates all his Five Points — “the supports, the roof gardens, the free design of the ground plan, the flat window, and the free design of the facade,” in Le Corbusier’s words. And in its manipulation of abstract kind that breaks from historic precedents, it influenced many generations of architects. Here’s a tour of the must-know modern home.

Villa Savoye at a Glance
Year built: 1931
Architects:
Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret
Location: Poissy, France
Visiting info: Individual and group tours available
Size: 1,340 square feet

More: 10 Must-Know Modern Homes

This country villa for Pierre and Emilie Savoye is located about 20 miles west of Paris, in what was a rural area in the time of its structure. Le Corbusier (who worked for 2 years along with his cousin Pierre with this and other endeavors) took the simple commission and turned it into a definite understanding of his Five Points manifesto. At the villa he shows how much expressive possible can be obtained using his or her theory.

The design can also be seen as the articulation of structure’s three primary components: flat slabs (flooring), vertical piers (structural columns) and walls (particularly facades). Lance LaVine, in his book Mechanics and Meaning in Architecture, parallels Le Corbusier’s search for meaning in these components with physicists’ turn-of-the-century discoveries of character’s constituent components: electrons, protons and neutrons.

Technology, as used in science and engineering, was a big influence on Le Corbusier, and the Villa Savoye further embodies his idea of the home as a “machine for living” — an expression he coined. Nevertheless that is always balanced by his view of the home as a machine to move you emotionally; it could be argued that this hall accomplishes.

Development encircled the villa at the decades since it had been finished, however, the building’s designation as a French national monument in the 1960s has allowed a lot of its first character to be maintained (and of course that it saved the building from ruin following the household left handed it circa World War II, and it was subsequently used for, among other things, a hay barn). The trees to the south east of the square building are pretty much exactly the exact same now as when the building was complete, though the open vista to the north and west was closed in by trees which help block the college and other buildings on those sides.

The trees on the south guaranteed that the loved ones and visitors (coming by automobile, no doubt) would experience the home in an opening after passing through the trees. As we will see, this promenade architecturale (a path strictly defined by the structure) continues into the home itself. Le Corbusier had written concerning the strategy to the Parthenon in Athens; Villa Savoye is a modern update to the therapy of strategy.

Le Corbusier had written that “the home must not have a front … it has to open out to the four horizons” Nonetheless, the south facade has become the most rear-like, stemming from the way in which the ground floor is not shining in the middle, and since the roof enclosure is only barely visible. The strategy shown here — the main approach — only hints at what the villa provides.

Among the most distinctive areas of the ground floor is that the porte cochere that wraps three sides of the building. Le Corbusier’s embrace of the automobile hauled (no pun intended) the plan, so the distance between the pilotis (slender columns) and outside wall is wide enough for a vehicle to pass through.

On north side of the building, the ground-floor walls become semicircular, based on the turning radius of an auto. Among those Savoye family’s three cars (one for each member of the wealthy household) could then stop in the entry in the middle of the semicircle, before the chauffeur would continue on around the west to park it at the three-car garage.

This north altitude is certainly more sculptural than the south side, and it also clearly occupies all the Five Points: The piano nobile (second floor) is lifted above the ground on an grid of pilotis; the walls of the floor are free from those columns; upstairs, a lengthy ribbon window extends from corner to corner; the window sits in the front of the columns, demonstrating the free facade; the curved walls in the roof specify 1 side of the roof garden.

Among the subtly intriguing characteristics of the design (covered at length in LaVine’s book) is how the structure appears regular but in fact changes in the grid when required. This view of the entrance from just beyond the pilotis shows why: The centre column is aligned with the doorway behind it, meaning that when the structure were at a regular grid, a column could land just behind the doorway, blocking entrance to the home.

So Corbusier doubled up the columns in 1 direction (left to right in the photograph) and altered them in the other direction; the paired columns and linking column are visible behind the glass round the entry door. This structural flexibility comes from utilizing concrete for those columns, beams and slabs. The material readily allows such manipulations.

However, this frees up and changing of those columns (what LaVine calls conditional structure, versus the exterior’s rationalstructure) doesn’t merely serve front doorway; it allows for a fundamental ramp which extends out of the ground floor all the way to the roof. This view of the entrance hall shows what the loved ones and visitors were faced with: the ramp onto one side, the spiral stair onto the other, and a washbasin placed on a column in between. (Beyond would be the maids’ rooms and the laundry room.)

Ramp or stair, each means of vertical circulation makes turns since it rises to provide people glimpses of different parts of the home and the environment. Both wind up on the next floor in a hallway near the large living room and the equally generous terrace to its south. A glass wall adjacent to the ramp opens to the patio and shows the outside ramp that heads up to the roof garden.

Before heading to the living space, let’s take a brief detour to the bedrooms. Here’s the bedroom at the southeast corner of the home. (Floor plans are found at the end of the ideabook.) While it shows how well the ribbon windows frame the surrounding landscape, this view is also interesting as it illustrates how Corbusier used color across the inside (and even the outside, given that the ground floor walls have been painted green, and the renowned International Style display and book of 1932 explain the roof enclosure as “blue and rose,” though since its recovery those walls are white). What’s more, the wall using a round corner on the side is in fact created by the bathtub in the adjoining bathroom bumping into the bedroom.

Access to the master bedroom happens through a corridor along with the master bath. This view in the bedroom shows how the two spaces are connected by an undulating bench in tile which echoes Corbusier’s famous chaise longue (observable in the entrance hall photograph and the following photograph, of the living room).

This famed view of a famed bathroom illustrates the open plan which Corbusier encouraged as one of his Five Points, even though it does it in a subtle way. Like any place at the villa, the columns don’t relate to surrounding walls; remember the columns sitting just outside the semicircular glass walls on the floor. The columns are freestanding, removed from the walls, even if by only about a foot.

The room is a large space that is generous by the standards of today. It can really be seen as a progenitor of today’s large “living areas.” Here we’re looking from before the kitchen. The foreground space could be utilized as the dining area; the fireplace suggests a split between the living room.

The expansion of the flat window in the living room to the patio gives cohesion to the outside (first picture), but in addition, it provides a constant framing of the surrounding landscape, no matter whether one is inside or outside.

The living room is connected to the patio through a huge sliding glass wall which faces south. This exposure means lots of sunlight enters the living room and the patio, in which a concrete table provides for outdoor dining.

A good deal of the design begins to fall into place once we step outside onto the patio. Here the skies — gone since we entered the porte cochere– reenters the image. The home can be seen as a tripartite layering of knowledge and meaning: The ground floor is a sheltered connection to ground which also helps boost the living spaces above it ; the next floor is your enclosed national realm that is protected from the elements nevertheless frames the trees and other environment throughout the ribbon windows; the roof connects one to the skies and a larger context visible beyond the trees.

That opinion beyond the trees is the main reason for a north-facing window which Corbusier cut into an enclosure which provides some privacy and a feeling of containment on the roof. This frame (which would not have appeared at a building in 1931) sends one’s gaze far in the space. It’s the culmination of the promenade architecturale that goes out of the automobile to the ramp (or stair) which zigzags together with the interior and exterior spaces. It’s an experience well worth getting, and thankfully this house’s national monument designation allows that.

References:
Boyer, M. Christine. Le Corbusier, Homme de Lettres. Princeton Architectural Press, 2011. Centre des Monuments Nationaux
Conrads, Ulrich, ed. Programs and Manifestoes on 20th-Century Architecture. MIT Press, 1994 (first published in 1964).Frampton, Kenneth. Le Corbusier: Architect of the Twentieth Century. Abrams, 2002. Hitchcok, Henry-Russell and Johnson, Philip. The International Style. W. W. Norton, 1995. (Originally published in 1932.)
Le Corbusier. Towards a New Architecture. Dover, 1986. (Originally printed as Vers une Architecture at 1923.)
LaVine, Lance. Mechanics and Meaning in Architecture. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Park, Steven. Le Corbusier Redrawn: The Houses. Princeton Architectural Press, 2012.

More: 10 Must-Know Modern Homes

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Have Your Open Kitchen and Close It Off

Allow me to say up front that at the great debate on open versus closed kitchens, I am firmly onto the open-plan team. I’ve helped dozens of layout clients tear down walls and open kitchens up to adjoining spaces, and demo day always brings enormous smiles as the homeowners obtain their first glimpse of what the newly opened-up kitchen is going to look and feel like.

However, after years of living with kitchens that are open, I realize there are many detractors amongst us. There are individuals who entertain and cook often and do not particularly like to have their own kitchen mess in open view of their guests. Some would rather not smell their dinner through the home long after it has been prepared and eaten. I propose that you can have your open-plan kitchen but use some suggestions to shut it off to conceal a mess, or to keep your guests from underfoot as you prepare your own feast.

Alan Mascord Design Associates Inc

Give Yourself Options

Consider installing a large sliding barn door or 2, to allow you the flexibility of having a spacious or closed kitchen. You can keep it available for everyday use — to delight in the open, expansive feel and circulation of light — while using the choice to close those doors if you want to keep children, pets out or visitors, or to conceal the prep mess while entertaining.

K.Marshall Design Inc..

Close off the part of the kitchen which sees the most action — like the area close to the primary sink or range. You can keep the rest of the kitchen, which perhaps doesn’t get overly cluttered, open and accessible to all.

diSalvo Interiors

If you want to have the ability to shut off the kitchen but still want to have an open atmosphere and light, put in a door made of a translucent material. You can close it to block out cooking scents or sounds without feeling entirely closed off from the rest of the home.

Allen Construction

These folding doors above the island are a brilliant way to produce a hybrid open-closed kitchen.

Bushman Dreyfus Architects

Visually Close It Away

That really is a cool option for a contemporary loft space. Metal mesh drapes installed on a monitor allow the kitchen to go from open to closed. The kitchen still has an open feel, but the drape can disguise any kitchen messes. It certainly discourages visitors from getting in the way while someone is elbow deep in meal prep, too.

Gast Architects

This kitchen combines closed and open in a means which allows the chef to still be a part of the party. A peninsula limits the circulation of traffic to the kitchen also creates more space for working cooking magic. Upper cabinets add to the partially enclosed effect.

Laidlaw Schultz architects

Raise Your Isle

If it’s not so much children or guests circulating to your kitchen area that disturbs you, but more a necessity to disguise meal-prep messes, consider increasing the far end of your island. It provides visitors a nice place to perch at as you work in the sink or cooktop, too.

Suyama Peterson Deguchi

Viewed from outside the kitchen, a raised island will obstruct the view to the kitchen work surfaces.

Loop Design

Insert a Half Wall

This kitchen opens to the adjacent dining area, but a half wall provides some separation. Additionally, it hides most of the work surfaces in the kitchen from perspective. This setup means someone can easily mingle together and serve guests without having the remains of their meal prep on full screen.

Vent the Smells

when you have an open-plan kitchen and cook often, I can not emphasize enough how important it is to put in a high quality, properly powered venting hood which vents to the outside. A recirculating blower simply will not cut it ; you need to receive the cooking smells up and out of your home.

Here is a guide to selecting and installing the correct vent hood to your kitchen.

Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects

Invest in Quieter Appliances

you desire your port hood to efficiently eliminate kitchen odors within a spacious kitchen, and you also want it to be quiet. Some port hoods and dishwashers are so loud when they are running, it’s like you are hanging out on a aircraft carrier once you are close to them. Great sound-dampened appliances are going to cost you more, but they’re worth it if you are dedicated to an open-plan concept and do not want to listen to excess blower sound.

Inform us : Can you prefer an open or closed kitchen? What are your tips for making it work for you?

See more kitchen design guides on

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Dreaming in Colour: 8 Magnificent Gray Bedrooms

Last week we looked at dramatic black bedrooms, so let us go several notches lighter this week and investigate the numerous shades of gray for bedrooms. I really like gray for its flexibility. You can go dark or light, warm or cool, and set the neutral with almost any other color. Cool grays appear fantastic combined with warm wood tones, or go for a warmer gray and add a few black, white or metallic accents for a clean, sophisticated vibe.

Read on for a sampling of stunning gray-clad bedrooms on , along with suggestions for pulling together your very own gray-hued room.

KYZLINK ARCHITECTS

This trendy gray wall color gets heated up well by the rich wood tones in the room. Touches of apple green and white around out this pleasingly modern palette.

Jennifer Ott Design

Get a similar appearance with Englewood Cliffs out of Benjamin Moore.

Chantel Elshout Design Consultancy

Add immediate elegance to your bedroom with grey walls. It is a great pick for showing off decorative white-painted trim because of the contrast it offers. Of course, a dark hue could eat up a great deal of light in the area and look somewhat apartment. Counteract by adding sparkling elements to the room, like the stunning chandelier found here.

Jennifer Ott Design

Get the Appearance with Down Pipe out of Farrow & Ball.

Kat Alves Photography

Here is another example of utilizing gray to set off intriguing architectural details — a dramatic sloped ceiling. A medium gray like this won’t compete with other colours, including artwork. But it offers just enough shade to help break up the walls in the ceiling.

Jennifer Ott Design

Get a similar appearance with Carolina Gull from Pratt & Lambert.

Vicente Burin Architects

Conversely, you can leave the walls white, or another light hue, and add gray to the ceiling. This makes a more intimate vibe, perfect for a bedroom.

Jennifer Ott Design

Get a similar appearance with Gray Stone out of Pittsburgh Paints.

i3 design group

So dark it is almost black, that this profound gray is a very dramatic choice. To keep your bedroom out of feeling gloomy or cave-like, it can help to have a minumum of one big window that brings in abundant sunlight. White linens also brighten the space and appear crisp and clean against the darkened walls.

Jennifer Ott Design

Get a similar appearance with Five O’Clock Shadow out of Kelly-Moore Paints.

j&o studio

Utilize a bold or dark shade to create a focal point in the room, like about the headboard wall. It produces a wonderful background for art art and fabrics. Your accent wall will stand out, if you keep the remaining walls and ceiling light-hued.

Jennifer Ott Design

Get a similar appearance with Sealskin out of Sherwin-Williams.

Chris Snook

Not a lover of walls? On the lookout for something lighter and thicker? It is OK, you can still go gray. I find that gray is among those few colors that is gratifying no matter how dark or light you go. Even the lightest shades won’t ever read as pastel or thin and one-note. This super-soft gray adds a layer of color and contrast to the soothing bedroom.

Jennifer Ott Design

Get a similar appearance with Paddlewheel Grey out of Glidden.

Anders Adelfang

My favorite shades of light gray possess a bit of green or blue. They are a nice “new neutral” option to white, white, beige or authentic gray. The hint of watery green or blue gives them a calm vibe that is ideal for a bedroom.

Jennifer Ott Design

Get a similar look with Chapel Spire out of Mythic Paint.

Inform us : Can you go gray in your bedroom? Are you a lover of dark and dramatic or soft and serene?

Just for fun (and color swatches): 50 Colors of Gray

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10 Inspired Ways to Refresh Your Mantel Now

What goes up must come down. That saying certainly applies to Christmas decorations. On this time of year you will find bare mantels everywhere looking sparse and alone, in contrast to the prior months of garlands and twinkling lights. What’s a mantel to perform after the attractiveness of Christmas?

The hearth is frequently seen as the middle of the home. That being said, that the mantel is a great place for displaying a story about the home or homeowner. It is a place for showcasing our favourite things, or it can be that one place for rotating weekly doses of design. Feeling like a new start for your mantel today that the holidays are winding down? Below are a few basic suggestions to kick off the new year. Let us know what’s on your mantel from the Opinions section.

Tucker & Marks

Ah, symmetry! What I particularly like about this mantel aside from the fantastic symmetry is that the layering of mirrors. Notice that the starburst mirror is mounted directly onto the built-in mirror. I suggest hiring an expert glass provider or framer for this type of installation.

Would you collect botanical prints? Display them on the mantel. It is fine to prop artwork up against a wall socket. Fresh potted plants act as perfect bookends.

Michelle Edwards

Repeat rounds. A round shape is a nice match to the squareness of a mantel. Here they’re used efficiently in pairs.

The Office of Charles de Lisle

A minimalist statement can also work on the mantel. Try grouping a cluster of like-colored pottery to one side. The visual weight of the group to one side helps produce a modern vibe. A great-looking pendant balances the vignette.

Reaume Construction & Design

A mantel can become your place to get a rotating design element. If you like a little something new every week, use this spot to display fresh flowers. Notice how the designer used light to create a focal point here.

Tucker & Marks

Why let your favourite china gather dust from the pantry? Look at putting a favourite dish collection upon the mantel for everyone to enjoy. Dishes can be mismatched or matching. Display them using small plate stands or easels.

Heritage Design Studio

Use location-specific accessories to produce a statement about your property. I can visualize this rustic-looking doorway in the mountains somewhere.

Bruce Kading Interior Design

Tell a story about your hobbies or occupation. I think this art is a classy way to showcase a riding hobby, a horse-breeding occupation or maybe only a love of horses.

Dan Phipps Architects

Let light do the speaking. Perhaps the only change needed for your mantel is the way by which it’s lit. Make an impression with intriguing pendants or sconces in pairs or alternative repeats.

Philpotts Interiors

Consider paint. I simply love the boldness of this high-gloss green. The color is sudden and enjoyable. There’s no need to overaccessorize a mantel with bold colour.

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On Trend: 8 European Chairs and Sofas for Ubercomfort

All I want to do this week would be discuss comfort. I’ve been burning the candle at both ends, and I’d like an afternoon off using a blanket, my iPad and one of those amazing chairs choices. European comfort never sacrifices style, so I would feel designworthy while lounging too.

You’ll find ample choices here, if you seem to Netherlands maker Artifort or Italian companies DePadova, Living Divani or Alivar. These contemporary design firms concentrate on stylish contemporary furnishings and also possess strong histories in furniture manufacturing. Each example featured here includes an element of deconstruction — some of those stuffiness and refinement are taken out of the couch or chair and replaced with user friendly and softness capabilities.

Note: it is possible to contact these businesses through the distributor or sales info on their websites.

depadova.it

Louisiana Armchair and Ottoman

This armchair is based on a saddle but is much more comfortable than a jostling horse. I believe this one would demand the ottoman for serious relaxation.

depadova.it

Légère Armchair

This chair has a pillow constructed right in — the back folds over to create a lavish spot only for your sagging head. Cotton fabric adds to the relaxed vibe.

alivar.com

SBang Sofa

This couch manages to seem totally pulled together but concurrently urges you to flop and lounge.

alivar.com

Daytona Sofa

There is a lighter-than-air caliber to this couch that reminds me of puffy white clouds. Full and fluffy, it is going to add lightness to a living area.

artifort.nl

500 Series Lounge Chair

A lounge chair like this reminds me of a big comfortable scoop, simply waiting to hold a curving body. The leather end and clean curves are a definite nod to midcentury style.

artifort.nl

F 444 Lounge Chair

A sling chair like this needs very little excuse, as it will mold to a form the moment that you rest your weary bones.

livingdivani.it

Dondolo Rocking Chair

Rock your way to contentment within this rocking chair. A leather seat and contemporary arms using clean lines make it several shades cooler compared to a classic rocker.

livingdivani.it

Rod Chair

This traditional contemporary armchair remains relaxed with overstuffed soft and cushioning finishes. I’d like a set squarely facing each other, using a large stone terrace nearby.

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Great Design Plant: California Fuchsia Brings Color and Hummingbirds

Until a couple of decades back, the only place I remember watching California fuchsia (Zauschneria californica)has been 7,000 ft high near Echo Summit, as patches of red blazing through cracks in gray granite boulders. Today it’s possible to see California fuchsia at your neigborhood nursery, possibly even Home Depot (Monrovia, the big wholesaler, grows and distributes a number).

California fuchsia has been tamed, losing the majority of its scraggly, crazy look but maybe not its bright color and toughness. It’s a reliable summer perennial for dry spots, particularly slopes. Hummingbirds love this, and also the plant depends on them.

Explore more blossoms | Garden ideas for your U.S. region

Waterwise Landscapes Incorporated

California fuchsia is a sun-loving perennial that is native. It receives its name from the form of the largely orange or crimson flowers, very similar to the common fuchsia — but it does not have the common fuchsia’s preference for cool, shady places.

Botanical name: Epilobium canum (or Zauschneria californica)
USDA zones: 6 to 9 (find your zone)
Water necessity: Light
Light requirement: Complete sun
Mature dimension: Greater than 1 foot to 4 feet tall and up to 4 ft wide, depending on variety

Distinguishing attributes. Tubular flowers arrive in bright orange or crimson. Leaves are grayish and small. Choose from a number of types of California fuchsia. Newer varieties, specifically, are long flowering. ‘Bert’s Bluff’ is orange red. ‘Ghostly Red’ gets the purest red blossoms and fuzzy gray-green leaves. Others include ‘UC Hybrid’ (developed at UC Davis) and ‘Calistoga’ (orange-red).

The best way to grow it. Plant it in autumn or early spring, so the roots can establish before warm weather. Make sure drainage is quick. Water it regularly (weekly or 2) during the first growing season. Once the crops are established, cut back to watering only as needed. Prune back based plants almost into the floor in autumn after the blossom season. Lightly prune the branch tips in spring to encourage bushy growth.

Monrovia

The best way to use it. For flashes of color, particularly during late summer and early autumn, when other crops fade, unite California fuchsia (revealed here is ‘Ghostly Red’) with mass plantings of other natives and Mediterranean plants. Line a path with it. Let it spill over a stone wall or boulders.

More: What to do in your region now | Browse thousands of landscape and garden photos

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